September 17th, 2014

Carriage and Wagon Update – September 2014

During the past few months, the C&W team have been involved in a number of projects, as well as carrying out running repairs on the running set.

Type 117 DMU

Work on the type 117 DMU continues. The gutters are in the process of being removed and moved to close the gaps, which will prevent water running down window seams. A rebuilt door has been fitted to the guards compartment, which has in turn shown the door pillar in a bad state of repair. A part of the roof has been covered with tarpaulin to prevent water ingress until a new roof section has been welded in place.

Derek grinds out part of the guttering.

Derek grinds out part of the guttering.

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The rebuilt guards door fitted, by Michael, to the DMU. It can be seen that to the right of the door, there is a rusty panel which will need to be cut out and replaced.

BCK 21059

The team have commenced preliminary work on the Mk1 BCK, (believed to be carriage 21059). Work had started on the carriage some years ago, but was halted partway in. The new wall panels are now covered with mould which has to be cleaned off by hand. The electrics also require some attention as a previous owner stripped the original cable. We are trying to obtain electrical drawings to establish what should be installed. The passage ends of the carriage end are damaged and will need to be changed.

This is a view down the corridor - note the ceiling and floor which needs replacement.

This is a view down the corridor – note the ceiling and floor which needs replacement.

Floor damage caused by water ingress down from the single glazed windows.

Floor damage caused by water ingress down from the single glazed windows.

Geoff cleans the wall panels with oxalic acid to remove the mould.

Geoff cleans the wall panels with oxalic acid to remove the mould.

New side panels in the process of manufacture. These will be upholstered before fitting.

New side panels in the process of manufacture. These will be upholstered before fitting.


Taylor & Hubbard Diesel Mechanical Crane 81027

A photo shoot has been arranged for November, and it has been requested that the EOR crane be included. The C&W team have been working on the crane to “tidy” it up.

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This image shows the crane trailer being worked on by Eddie and Bob, viewed from the Ongar end.

The crane viewed from the North Weald end. Note the primer paint on rusted bodywork and the yellow undercoat on the jib.

The crane viewed from the North Weald end. Note the primer paint on rusted bodywork and the yellow undercoat on the jib.

Dick Savill

Carriage & Wagon Department


September 7th, 2014

Diesel Department Update – August 2014

THUMPER UNIT 205205

Since our last article things have moved on with the restoration work on the ‘Thumper Unit’.

The Motor coach cab and the Driving Trailer (DT) cab has now been completed.

Thumper Mystery

When we were preparing the DT Cab for repainting, Ken found a driver’s name; “Steve ……”   (We can’t read the rest,) and the date 22/05/2004 – the final day in service – written above the driver’s window.

Do you know who the mystery Selhurst Driver was? If so, there is an open invention for them to come down to North Weald and see the unit looking resplendent in its old Network South East colours.

Name

The Thumper also now carries the name of a former Driver’s wife in both cabs: ‘Michelle’

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Motor Coach Driving Cab

In the motor coach cab there was a major job with the fabrication and fitting of a complete new emergency cab door. The cab door is of a none standard size, much narrower than a standard door.

The whole process proved to be far harder than we expected. The original window, internal window guides and looking mechanism were reused. It was found that there was no adjustment on the hinges, or the strange emergency door looking mechanism. This was compounded by the door not fitting quite right in the opening.

It took many hours of work to marry the door with its frame correctly.

New draught excluders were also made up and fitted.

A number of cab wall panels were covered with plastic material, which needed repair or stripping off the backing and remaking. There were quite a lot of spot repairs required to other wall panels.

The flour covering also required spot repairs.

The Drivers and second man’s seats were removed and repaired . The seat cushions were recovered in correct Network South East pattern material, which proved to be a highly skilled job.

Newly constructed Emergency Door, complete with the Network South East material covered ‘Jump’ seat. Note the new draught excluders and repainted cab.

Newly constructed Emergency Door, complete with the Network South East material covered ‘Jump’ seat. Note the new draught excluders and repainted cab.

The whole cab was prepared and completely repainted. (This also took far longer than we expected.)

When preparing the paintwork we found a number a large paint runs that predated 1980 some of which we decided to leave in place as they had become part of the units history.

New transfers were obtained were fitted.

The Driving Trailer Cab

The roof of this cab had leaked water for many years. Ken, one of our younger volunteers, searched out and solved the problem on the roof, which was found to be caused by leaks where conduit passed through the roof

The second-man’s side wall was found to be completely rotten and had to be stripped out and replaced. This meant that Michael Fisher, our highly skilled engineer, had to also take out a lot of large metal housings. This took a great deal of time and effort, as many of the fixing were hard to get at. I took the opportunity to take the metal work home and paint it ready for refitting.

Due to more pressing jobs we had to leave the cab for some time before recommencing work, which was quite lucky – when we first examined the cab, we believed that we would have to replace most of the wall and roof panelling due to water damage. However, the panels dried out and proved to be in much better condition than we had believed, requiring only spot repairs.

In a similar manner to the Motor coach cab, we found some historic pain runs which we left in place.

Ken preparing DT cab for repainting.

Ken preparing DT cab for repainting.

We also attempted to respect the age of the unit (57 years being constructed in 1957 and rebuilt in the 1980’s.) leaving worn indicator plates in situ and also replacing English Electric makers plates which were hacked off control cabinets many years ago with similar transfers.

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Graham repairs a panel in the now-completed driving trailer cab.

The Engine Room

The Engine room is well on its way to completion. So far the team has taken ten months (one or two days a week) to get the engine room to its present condition. The whole of the engine room and Diesel engine / generator was cleaned of grease, oil and rust, back to a base which formed the first layer of paint. This was a very long, tedious and dirty job – at times you wondered what you had got yourself in to.

The whole of the engine room has now been repainted in the appropriate grey as has the generators and Diesel engine.

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As throughout this period the Thumper has been in use, you can imagine that you can clean up an area ready for painting and return next week to find spots of oil and dirt on your pristine base coat.

At the moment Mick and his team are painting all the pipe work in the correct colour code; Brown for Fuel oil, Pink for lubricating oil, Blue for coolant and so on. As it has been many year since the pipes were painted, we have had to trace to pipe work back to source.

Thumper Outstanding Work

The Driving Trailer cab vestibule needs some remedial work and repainting, as does the guard’s compartment.

The major job, due to ingress of water over many years, is to replace the luggage compartment roof panels and most of the wall planking, then completely repaint.

Rest Of The Fleet

03119 is now back in service, acting as the North Weald pilot shunt Loco following its top end engine overhaul.

03119 is now back in service, acting as the North Weald pilot shunt Loco following its top end engine overhaul.

Our 37 and 31 continue to give reliable service, seen resting in the head shunt at North Weald

Our 37 and 31 continue to give reliable service, seen resting in the head shunt at North Weald

The North Weald pilot engine, 03170, undergoing side rod bearing changes.

The North Weald pilot engine, 03170, undergoing side rod bearing changes.

Chris Travers

EOR Diesel Restoration Group

 


June 20th, 2014

Carriage & Wagon Update June 2014

 SPECIAL EDITION OF THE CARRIAGE AND WAGON DEPARTMENT’S DIARY AS MARK 2 TSO CARRIAGE M5136 IS RETURNED TO TRAFFIC FOR THE STEAM GALA

This  update seeks to show how the restoration of the carriage was achieved from start to finish. (The various images probably have been published  in earlier Departments Diary as parts of a general update.) This article shows the various stages of the restoration in one article.

Carriage M5136 was taken out of traffic post Christmas 2012 as the floor in the Epping end of the carriage had collapsed so badly that it was no longer safe to use; complete replacement was required. To carry out replacement the whole of the interior had to be stripped out to allow access.
The seats and all interior fittings were removed and stored at the Ongar end of the carriage. The wall panels were then removed, as the Railway Management had decided that the interior should be a wood veneer finish.

The cause of the damage was investigated, and it was found that some window frames had lost their seal between the frames and the carriage wall on the North Weald Platform one side, which allowed water to ingress into the carriage and down to the underfloor level. One of the window openings had rusted so badly, the the rust had to be cut out and a metal insertion piece welded in. All the frames on that side were removed, cleaned up, sealed and riveted back in place.

The area where most of the ingress of water occurred

The area where most of the ingress of water occurred.

Ken surveys the damaged flooring. The wall panelling has been removed and Dave can be seen in the         background preparing the carriage frame for rust treatment to be applied.

Ken surveys the damaged flooring. The wall panelling has been removed and Dave can be seen in the background preparing the carriage frame for rust treatment to be applied.

The sheet metal piece has been welded into place, the window frame replaced with new sealant and riveted  in place. The new rivets in the adjacent window can be clearly seen.

The sheet metal piece has been welded into place, the window frame replaced with new sealant and riveted in place. The new rivets in the adjacent window can be clearly seen.

As well as the windows being re-sealed on the outside, many of the double glazed windows needed to be replaced, as the seals between the glass panes had broken down, causing the windows to "fog". This is a long an laborious task, as all the old screws are corroded in place and had to be drilled and tapped out. George and Norman are seen in this image carrying out this work on one window.

As well as the windows being re-sealed on the outside, many of the double glazed windows needed to be replaced, as the seals between the glass panes had broken down, causing the windows to “fog”. This is a long an laborious task, as all the old screws are corroded in place and had to be drilled and tapped out. George and Norman are seen in this image carrying out this work on one window.

New wall panels were manufactured and installed. They were stained to the required shade, and then many coats of Danish Teak Oil were applied to give an overall pleasing sheen to the panels.

New wall panels were manufactured and installed. They were stained to the required shade, and then many coats of Danish Teak Oil were applied to give an overall pleasing sheen to the panels.

Now that the wall panels have been fitted and the window glass replaced where required the window trims have been refitted, the carriage had started to look towards completion.

Now that the wall panels have been fitted and the window glass replaced where required the window trims have been refitted, the carriage had started to look towards completion.

The insulation has been laid and now the linoleum floor has been installed. This was a break, as now the carriage could be reinstalled and completed.

The insulation has been laid and now the linoleum floor has been installed. This was a break, as now the carriage could be reinstalled and completed.

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The skirting has been installed, and now the seat frames are being re-installed ready for the seats themselves.

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All done – seats installed luggage racks in place.

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The C&W department were asked, unexpectedly, to improve the appearance of the outside of the carriage, where the window frames were resealed to the body. We have to look towards the Ongar end, probably winter 2014.

Dick Savill

Carriage & Wagon Department


May 10th, 2014

Carriage & Wagon Update, May 2014

The past 5-6 weeks have seen good progress being made on the Type 117 DMU and the TSO, M5136. The DMU is required for the forthcoming Diesel Gala, and the TSO is needed in the working rake ASAP. There have been some delays, caused by late delivery of the floor insulation for the TSO, and the requirement to overlay the bitumen covered floor in the DMBS section of the DMU. On a very encouraging note, all four engines have been started and run on the DMU. One sounded rather lumpy, but it is felt that a maintenance check will find and eliminate the problem.

Type 117 DMU

The plywood floor covering nearing completion. Geoff can be seen working at the far end of the coach.

The plywood floor covering nearing completion. Geoff can be seen working at the far end of the coach.

 

New floor covering has been laid in the Epping end cab and Paul is seen here preparing the drivers seat.

New floor covering has been laid in the Epping end cab and Paul is seen here preparing the drivers seat.

The completed plywood floor covering, and all side wall panels back in place. Hopefully the new lino floor covering will be installed the week commencing 19th May.

The completed plywood floor covering, and all side wall panels back in place. Hopefully the new lino floor covering will be installed the week commencing 19th May.

A blackbird chose to nest on one of the engines, which prevented us starting it for a couple of weeks. The blackbird had vacated the nest  by Tuesday 6th May, which allowed us to start and test the engines.

A blackbird chose to nest on one of the engines, which prevented us starting it for a couple of weeks. The blackbird had vacated the nest by Tuesday 6th May, which allowed us to start and test the engines.

One of the double glazed windows, which had completely misted due to a break in the seal between the 2 panes. Replacing the glass is a time consuming and laborious task, as all the old screws have corroded, thus having to be drilled out and have the threads re-tapped.

One of the double glazed windows, which had completely misted due to a break in the seal between the 2 panes. Replacing the glass is a time consuming and laborious task, as all the old screws have corroded, thus having to be drilled out and have the threads re-tapped.


TSO M5136

 

George and Dick at work, screwing the new window glass in place in the Ongar end of the coach.

George and Dick at work, screwing the new window glass in place in the Ongar end of the coach.

MKII PLywood New

The lower level plywood floor covering laid and ready to accept the insulation layer. As the insulation was delivered late, the top layer of plywood was cut ready to fit.

The new insulation boards ready to be cut to size.

The new insulation boards ready to be cut to size.

With the insulation in place, the top layer of plywood flooring is fitted in place.

With the insulation in place, the top layer of plywood flooring is fitted in place.

 

Dick Savill
Carriage & Wagon Team

 


April 22nd, 2014

Diesel Department Update – April 2014

Thanks from the restoration team

Hi and thank you from the team to everyone (and there have been many) who have specifically come down to the Epping and Ongar railway to see and ride on the Thumper (which is one of the oldest examples of preserved UK Diesel main line traction.)
We have had a real mix, from families, former main line drivers, through to hardened enthusiasts.

We have been related lots of stories, such as going to school on the Thumper, or meeting their partners on our actual unit. Over the forty-seven years of the unit’s mainline service, so many stories and so much personal history intertwined with the Thumper.

If you are interested in our Thumper please speak to the crew. We have been giving tours (time permitting), talks and picture opportunities of the engine room and power car cab.

Looking forward to seeing you all.

The Thumper Roars again

I was working in the Thumper engine room when Jim and John – two of our restoration group’s engineers – returned to sort out a reoccurring fault on one of the low voltage control circuits.

Now as I am accepted as a sort of apprentice to the engineers, Jim took me under his wing and outlined what they intended to do.  (It all sounded very complicated.)

Jim was talking very complex ‘stuff’ and pointing at a very large complicated wiring diagram.

I sagely nodded my understanding of the action plan, uttering a few, I hope, appropriate engineering type words at the correct moment. Jim must have been convinced I was up to speed as he let me hold his tools!!!!!!!

You will remember from our last Blog, we rewired 4 H control wire and we managed to gain full power, but we found this was masking another control fault which was causing chattering main power contacts, which in turn caused a problem getting away and also encouraged wheel spin.

Jim and John checking contactors, with temporary ‘jumper’ wiring in place.

Jim and John checking contactors, with temporary ‘jumper’ wiring in place.

Jim and John performed more minor modifications, further rewiring and after a battery of tests traced the fault to a 90 volt control relay on 4 h control circuit. The relay moving parts was found to be badly worn which in turn allowed to low voltage contacts to twist, make and then break causing the main contacts, which the 90 volt circuit controlled, to open and close. (Chattering)

Complicated ‘Stuff’ - John sorts out a wiring issue.

Complicated ‘Stuff’ – John sorts out a wiring issue.

As this type of relay is no longer available, the guys dismantled it; with some adjustments, they managed to take the wear out of the majority of the moving parts but two sections were beyond repair. John disappeared with the defective parts returning about an hour later with replacement parts he had fabricated. The relay was reassembled and refitted, more tests.

All test results positive!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Everything worked correctly, surely not – do the tests again; still good?

I was given the honour of driving the Thumper on the test runs.

For the first time since the Thumper was delivered from the North York Moors railway, we believed she would run without fault.

And she did, leaving North Weald climbing up the steep bank to the M11 bridge where we stopped on one of the steepest sections of the route.

The Thumper was given full power, with a roar she was away without any hesitation; in fact she had to be held back after a few seconds.  A truly historic moment.

After a number of test runs she was still running without issue – no reoccurring faults!!!!

The following day our independent engineer tested the Thumper and once again she was passed for full service.

For me to drive the Thumper on this the first test run where she had fully operated as designed was a very special moment at the end of three years’ work and a huge amount of time given by so many people (and so much money invested) to get the Thumper to this stage of restoration.

The Thumper at Coopersale after completing its first fully successful test run. Just three of the many very talented  people who have put in so many hours, materials and money into restoring the Thumper to its present restored condition:  John (Mechanical Engineer), Michael K  (our engine room project team leader) and Jim (our Electrical Design Engineer.)

The Thumper at Coopersale after completing its first fully successful test run. Just three of the many very talented people who have put in so many hours, materials and money into restoring the Thumper to its present restored condition:
John (Mechanical Engineer), Michael K (our engine room project team leader) and Jim (our Electrical Design Engineer.)

The Engine room project

It is now five months since the team started work in the Thumper engine room. If I was asked to describe the condition of the engine room when we started, I would say if you could imagine a Stone Age man in his cave keeping his cooking fire going for thirty years laying a covering on the walls and roof of hard carbon and add a garnish of oily soot you would just about get the picture.

The generator was a mass of flaking paint and rust with the engine in a similar condition but with the added delights of oil, diesel and water leaks, which only became evident when we degreased and cleaned the engine. The rear baulk head was covered in oil and slime.

Huge progress in the Thumper engine room - with the roof and bulkheads now top coated, the walls receive the first coat of red oxide paint.

Huge progress in the Thumper engine room – with the roof and bulkheads now top coated, the walls receive the first coat of red oxide paint.

Michael working away in the confined space of the engine room. At this stage the engine room had been cleaned, the engine /generator has been coated with anti rust paint and the roof is painted with red oxide.

Michael working away in the confined space of the engine room. At this stage the engine room had been cleaned, the engine /generator has been coated with anti rust paint and the roof is painted with red oxide.

The walls and roof of the engine room have been cleaned with heavy duty cleaner. (We looked like moon men with our protective equipment.) The Diesel engine and generator have been prepared for undercoating at the moment coated in antirust Paint.

As you will see in the pictures much of the engine room painting has now been completed.

A new exhaust cowl has been fitted around the exhaust outlet pipe to reduce the size of the roof exhaust outlet. It is hoped this will now prevent the exhaust fumes being sucked back in to the engine room by the negative engine room air pressure.

We have also hopefully repaired a minor water leak and a leak on the Diesel supply pipe work.

The Power Car Cab/ guard’s compartment

Almost all the cab repairs have been completed and Ken has almost finished undercoating.

Thumper power car cab is undercoated.

Thumper power car cab is undercoated.

The guard’s compartment grey paint has been completed but the cream paint is on hold until we replace some further pieces of rotten wood. 

The DT Cab

Still lots of work to do.

The Glass fibre coach door repair

Michael F. completed the extensive repairs to the MK1 coach door and it fitted first time without need to adjustment.

This proved to be a highly skilled time consuming job but hopefully Michael high quality work will last many years.

Class 31 Loco

The class 31 with roof removed ready for Blower change. Note the very important part of any engineer's kit in the foreground - a cup of tea!

The class 31 with roof removed ready for Blower change. Note the very important part of any engineer’s kit in the foreground – a cup of tea!

Back in full operating service after number two traction motor blower change, a huge job, removing the roof, main reservoir tank, number two (main) compressor, only then could the engineers get to the blower.

Class 37 Loco

Now back in full service after replacement engine parts were obtained and fitted.

Ready and waiting with an engineering train.

Ready and waiting with an engineering train.

Class 25

The Loco is still out of service pending body rebuilding, but a great deal of remedial electrical work has been completed.

Class 47 Loco

There have been earth faults developing on the lighting and cab heat circuits. The team have been working to resolve this issue.

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Class 03 (119)

She is in an advance state of the engine rebuild. Waiting certain engine parts.

Class 03 (170)

Doing an excellent an excellent Job as North Weald Depot pilot.

 

Until next time,

Chris Travers

Epping Ongar Railway Diesel Restoration Team


April 2nd, 2014

Publicity Report – Lakenheath

The Epping Ongar Railway were invited to the Travel Fair at Lakenheath. We were originally told about the event by Trisha – who organises the King Harold’s Day event at Waltham Abbey – who got the organisers to invite us. We at the publicity team of the Epping Ongar Railway Volunteer Society were excited about the prospect of being at the event because of the potential of publicising to service personnel and their families at the Airbase.

The event took place on Saturday 1st March at the Eagles Landing officer club in their main hall. EORVS had a table next to the Epping Forest District Council tourism table. The EFDC are our partners at other travel events, such as Excursions at Alexandra Palace and the Tourism & Leisure Show at Five Lakes resort near Colchester. We have jointly promoted events in Epping Forest like the church at Waltham Abbey, Royal Gun Powder Mills, Secret Nuclear Bunker and so on, so we are well used to working together.

The event turned out to be successful as most people that came by our tables wanted to know about both Epping Forest attractions and Epping Ongar Railway. Most of the visitors knew about or of Epping – as a lot of the people visit London by coming to Epping to park their vehicles and take the tube from there. This meant that giving directions to Epping was not a problem.

I can say from the opening at 10am till about 2pm it was very busy and, up until 4pm, it was less busy though we still had a steady flow of visitors. The organisers of Lakenheath have a system where visitors take a green sheet of A5 paper, called a Green Passport, to exhibitor’s tables where they are then given a stamp. Visitors get their passport stamped at each table until they are full. The passports are then posted in a bin where they will go into a raffle prize draw – the EOR donated a family ticket for the draw. The passport will ensure people visit your tables and take leaflets while getting their cards stamped.

We were competing with a whole host of events which gives a wide variety of choice for the personnel and families to visit, and I’m sure Epping Forest must offer a good variety of interesting places to visits.

I must, on behalf of the Epping Ongar Railway,  thank Sue at Waltham Abbey Tourist Information Centre, Trisha of Waltham Abbey King Harold’s Day event and the rest of EFDC team for the organisation, and help of the events like Excursions, Tourism & Leisure Show and Lakenheath. I think our working together helps strengthen our ties on promoting. This makes Epping Forest an exciting place to visit.

Eddie, Ron, Jeff, Roger & John

Epping Ongar Railway Publicity Team


March 7th, 2014

Carriage & Wagon Update – March 2014

BLUE/GREY MK2 TSO M5136

The past few weeks have seen a lot of progress with this coach, as it is required ASAP to put back into the working rake. The Group have now resolved the problems of window leaks and, given the volume of rain experienced, the windows have been successfully tested. The Group have now commenced rebuilding the interior of the Epping end of the carriage.

Painting the new ceiling.

George and Colin giving the ceiling a smart new coat of paint. 

Installing new panels

Dave and Geoff installing the new panels.

Coating re-instated panels with teak oil.

All panels have been installed, stained and are receiving several coats of teak oil. Dave H is in the lower foreground applying another coat.

CLASS 117 DMU

The group have also worked hard on the type 117 DMU. It was decided that the Epping end coach seats were the be removed and sent away for re-upholstering. They have now been removed and stored in the Guards section of the carriage – unfortunately this has revealed the poor condition of the floor covering below the seats. It has therefore been decided to replace the floor covering. Many of the wooden steps into the coach need to be replaced. The sole-bars behind the steps have also corroded. The corrosion has been removed and primed ready for the whole sole-bar to be repainted.

Removing the old floor.

Colin hard at work removing the old floor covering, a demanding task.

30% of the floor

1 section of the coach floor covering removed, about 30% of the total floor area.

Trims remvoed

The trim around the maintenance traps have also been removed by Derek.

Priming the sole-bars.

Paul is seen priming the corroded areas of the sole-bar. He will continue with applying a top coat in the near future.

Dick Savill