November 18th, 2014

Rodger’s Team

At Ongar, we have agreed a snagging list, that will keep us busy before we reopen fully next April. There is a lot to be done, including work on the Station building, the outbuildings, Signal Box and gates etc.

One major job will be to put tiles around the urinal, sink and inside the closet of the Gents’ toilet, to make the area more hygienic – and ‘prettier.’ We have made a start by painting the rafters, and tidying up some of the paintwork. The weighbridge has had the lettering repainted white, and soon the rest of it will be painted in black.

Each week, we clean the floors and windows of the Station: where does all the dirt come from?! This ensures we have a presentable Station for the following weekend, and we carry out running repairs, as required. For Hallowe’en, we decorated the Station and the marquee, which housed the face painter, pumpkin carving, apple bobbing and blood and vomit soup, and created the Gruesome Graveyard. There was a lot to do, and we were fortunate that members of other departments assisted us. The C&W team painted the Finnish Loco matt black but kept the ‘Rest in Pieces’ slogan that was written on it, until after the event.

Moving to North Weald, the main project is the rebuild of the ‘Shark’ Brake Van DB993859; this is led by John Wilson. We have finished all the major jobs and only have the upholstering of the seats to finish, before the eighteen-month restoration is completed by the fitting of a cloth roof over the tongue & groove planks. The outside has had three coats of Matt Black; the inside is in Cream and Salsa Red with the underframe and plough in Gloss Black. John has built new seating inside the internal cabin (we reckon six people can now sit inside), a guard’s desk and a top for lamps.

Originally, we hoped to have the Shark ready for the November 15th Photo Shoot; unfortunately, the roof is not finished, but we are confident that it will be in use for next season, giving Brake Van rides. We have calculated that we could squeeze a total of up to 20 people inside and on the veranda outside.

Bob Watkins has made a new window frame for the Signal Box, which is now installed. We will start the rubbing down on most of the other window frames and painting, and will also work on the floors of the Signal Box, Booking Hall and Ticket Office. This involves sanding and sealing them to cut down on the dust.

At present, Bob is building a set of large gates for the gap between the Gents’ toilet and the Anglia Café Coach area, using the same design of those that were there 100 years ago.

We have started the long job of ‘Cuprinoling’ all wooden fences, and soon we will start repainting the white lines on all platform edges (at least, when the weather allows.) We continue to clean the Anglia Café Coach and the Station building each week, and carry out smaller restoration/repair tasks, as required.

The EORVS has donated one of the North Weald GER benches, (which we stripped down and repainted), to the North Weald Mums, who have a new Children’s Playground at the back of the Village Hall.

Plenty of work is pencilled in for 2015 so if you would like to help, do please join the society and get in touch.

For the 2015 season we will (I hope) have an additional EOR/EORVS Gift Shop situated in the Portacabin at North Weald, which will require staffing every day we are open. We also hope to be able to sell refreshments, including alcohol, on more trains throughout the season.

With an additional shop and more onboard catering, we need more volunteers to come forward and assist us in ensuring we can adequately cover these outlets, which provide valuable income for the Railway and the EORVS.

You will be given full training , which is not onerous, for any roles you choose to help out with.

Rodger Green


November 18th, 2014

Diesel Department November Update

Thumper DEMU

The Thumper being restored to a high standard. With its Network SouthEast paint work, fully functioning heating, lighting and public address system, it is proving to be a big attraction for visitors. Last Saturday (November 15), the train – feeling warm and cosy – was completely full on leaving Ongar, in effect recreating rush hour in the Essex countryside!

The cab rides (£5.00 per – person see the Driver) and the engine room tours (free to our passengers – again, see the Driver) are both proving very popular.

Thanks to everyone who has come up and taken an interest in the Thumper.

After a year’s work, the engine room refurbishment of the unit has been completed. The team have done an unbelievable job, but I will let the pictures speak for themselves. A big well done to Mick and his team of volunteers.

Before work.

Inside the engine room before work began.

Work completed.

The completed work, after many months hard graft.

Mick and his handiwork.

A very proud Mick, team leader, in the completed engine room.

After many, many hours of work (and considerable expenditure,) the team has also now completed refurbishment work on both Driving cabs, the Driving trailer vestibule and the Guards compartment.

Luggage Compartment

The external roof of the luggage compartment has been repaired. Now that the rain has stopped penetrating the roof, Michael (our skilled engineer) has started work replacing the internal celling panels. Another long job due to some of the complex panel cut-outs required.

Michael replaces the ceiling panels.

Michael at work inside the Thumper’s luggage compartment.

After the roof has been repaired, the rotten wooden wall panels will be replaced, and a number of smaller jobs completed. The whole of the Baggage compartment will then be repainted in the appropriate grey with white roof.

Passenger Compartment

It is intended to replace all of the upholstery with the correct Network SouthEast pattern material in the passenger compartment, and carry out a number of small jobs once the required substantial funds have become available.

Of all of our rolling stock, the Thumper covers the highest passenger mileage by far, and has proved very reliable since the completion of the remedial electrical work in May. She will still be keeping our engineers busy in the quiet period after New Year, with their to do list of preventative maintenance once we source the required parts. With old trains, obtaining replacement parts is always difficult and can prove expensive – especially if the old parts have to be re-manufactured.

Class 37, 37029 Locomotive (D6729)

The team has started work on our class 37 locomotive, bringing the cabs, which have been untouched since the loco was withdrawn from the main line service by DRS –  up to a similar standard to the refurbished cabs of the Class 31, 03 locomotives and the Thumper.

 

Many of you will be aware that our class 37 was rebuilt in the early 1980s as a heavy freight engine. She was re-geared to a lower speed of 80mph (pulling much heavier trains at this lower speed), the boiler was removed and the water tank converted to long range diesel tank, holding a total 1800 gallons of diesel fuel. The external body was also modified and, at an earlier date, she was converted to a dual braking system. She was later also fitted with the modern main line requirements, such as data recorders and radios etc.

 

From the restoration teams point of view, the big dilemma with the Class 37 Locomotive is, it has been repainted externally as a she would have looked when it came in to service in October 1961 as a mixed traffic engine, in BR green body with a grey roof. If we refurbish the cabs to match the external 1960s paintwork, she should be finished in Green and cream.

 

In our refurbishment work, the team has abided to the principal of completing the loco/unit to the correct colour scheme and transfers for its body type/equipment. However, as a BR heavy freight class 37, the cab should be refurbished in grey and cream, but this would be out of place with the external colour. The feeling, however, is we should carry on with the 1960 theme and finish the cab in these colours.

 

Remedial work have started in both cabs – lots of rubbing down, spot repairs being carried out, a base coat of red oxide applied as required and a undercoat of white applied in number one cab. The white undercoat gives us a base to work off. The now empty Radio housing cabinets have been removed from the cab ceilings, leaving a very large hole to be repaired; the radio – and a lot of other equipment – was stripped for reuse on other DRS locos when our 37 was withdrawn from the main line.

Class 37 cab with red oxide

Work begins inside the cabs of the class 37.

 

Mich removes the radio housing unit.

Mick removes the redundant radio equipment housing unit.

The gap left by the removed unit.

With the radio housing removed , we have to work out the best method of remaking the roof lining. The roof mounted ventilators were also removed for repair.

There is a great deal of work to complete. The “TO DO” list just keeps growing as we get into the job; it’s a case of the more we do, the more we find that needs doing.

Class 47, 47635 Locomotive

At present the Class 47 is stopped, awaiting engine parts.

Class 03 Shunting Locomotives

03119

The Engineers have working hard to trace an electrical fault which was causing a starting issue. Like many of these, there was more than one fault that, when combined, prevented the loco from starting. This was traced to switch gear contacts that needed cleaning, and a defective cell in the batteries. The loco is now back in full working order as the North Weald Depot pilot engine.

 03170

The re-manufacturing of the side rod bearings is progressing well. The bearings are actually being cast and machined, then cold pressed into the side rods in our in our own workshops.

Side rods nearing completion.

The repainted side rods, with the new “in-house” made bearings pressed into place.

03 awaits rods.

03170 patiently awaiting the refitting of its rods.

Class 31, 31438 Loco

This loco is proving reliable and is in much demand, being fitted with electrical train heat supply. Dave has been cleaning and painting around the alternator in the engine room. She was in use this last Saturday (November 15) along with the class 37 for a night photo shoot. She was also the stand-by by engine for the Halloween specials, which were a huge success.

Dave in the engine room.

Dave back at work in the 31’s engine room.

Class 25, 25173

The class 25 had one last outing on October 11, replacing the class 33 on “Southern Saturday.” Despite being out of traffic for some time, after a quick service she performed without fault. She has now departed for her long awaited bodywork rebuild, and a long list of other remedial mechanical work.

The 25 departs.

Until we meet again – the class 25 has departed for major work to be carried out.

 

Until next time…

Chris Travers

EOR Diesel Restoration Group


November 18th, 2014

Carriage And Wagon Update – November 2014

The C&W group have been carrying out works on several vehicles over the summer months, including BCK21059, the Taylor and Hubbard crane, the Blue/Grey TSO and the Finnish Loco, as well as assisting with the Halloween events.

BCK 21059

The BCK has suffered from a great deal of water damage, mainly due to condensation running down from the single gazed windows into faulty drainage systems. There was also no insulation between the outer metal skin and the internal panels. The water ingress also caused damage to floor panels.

Dave treats underframe

The old floor section has been removed in the first of the second class compartments. The under frame is being cleaned and treated by Dave.

The new floor panel has been put into place. The new wall insulation can also be clearly seen.

The new floor panel has been put into place. The new wall insulation can also be clearly seen.

A section of corridor floor has been removed and the under frame treated  with red oxide, ready for the new section of floor to be installed.  A new floor panel can be seen further up the corridor.

A section of corridor floor has been removed and the under frame treated
with red oxide, ready for the new section of floor to be installed. A new floor panel can be seen further up the corridor.

As well as repairing the fabric of the interior, the carriage needs re-wiring, and to this end a circuit diagram has been ordered from the NRM.

TAYLOR AND HUBBARD CRANE 81026

The crane has been smartened up with a coat of paint in readiness for a photo charter on 15th November. (This will probably have taken place by the time you read this).

Repainted Crane

The crane, looking smart, ready for the photo charter.

 

BLUE GREY BSO: BR MK2A 9385, re-numbered E9385

For some while, a rust patch has been pushing the paint away from the carriage – an almost perfect circle. The paint was removed, loose rust wire brushed off and a rust treatment applied. Once this had dried, filler was applied, sanded smooth, an painted.

Treated Rust

The rust-patch, with treatment applied.

Repair done.

The finished repair.

HALLOWEEN

The C&W Group enthusiastically helped with the Halloween event, erecting the marquee, decorating carriages, and generally assisting where needed.

Halloween Coach Decorations

Suitably decorating the carriage interiors.

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FINNISH LOCO “LOKOMO 2-8-2″

There is an expectation that the Finnish Loco will be departing site by the end of November. Given that there is a growing interest in viewing the loco movement, it was decided to smarten it up from its dilapidated condition.

Tidy Finnish Loco

The Finnish Loco, near the station building at Ongar, is due to leave soon. Its appearance has been neatened in readiness.

 

Dick Savill

Carriage And Wagon Group


October 3rd, 2014

Publicity Report – September

The publicity machine hit the ground running in September, after a relatively quiet month in August. Significantly in August, we managed to get people to the Steam on the Met event between Rickmansworth and Chesham – thanks to Gary and the Team for going to the event at short notice. Flyers were printed in time for the event promoting our End of the Tube event from 26 – 28 September. This meant we could target the very people who would be interested in our event.
Just some of our publicity team, seen here at Rickmansworth during Steam On The Met.

Just some of our publicity team, seen here at Rickmansworth during Steam On The Met.

Gary, Jeff and Ken handing out our leaflets. Our stall also sells some merchandise, which helps us pay for the event and raise money for the railway and volunteer society.

Gary, Jeff and Ken handing out our leaflets. Our stall also sells some merchandise, which helps us pay for the event and raise money for the railway and volunteer society.

September has given us the opportunity to target both local and London-wide events for the autumn season. We took Supercar to Hoddesdon, where there was a lot of interest in the railway. Unfortunately Supercar has developed some body problems over our busy year and it was decided she should receive immediate attention at LBC’s Northfleet Bus Works.
The events covered so far have been the Hampton Transport Gala, Bishop Stortford Model Railway Exhibition, Essex Country Show at Barleylands and Acton LT Museum Open Day. This has meant handing lots of leaflets and flyers to publicise our railway and the upcoming special events
Eddie Veckranges
Publicity

September 17th, 2014

Carriage and Wagon Update – September 2014

During the past few months, the C&W team have been involved in a number of projects, as well as carrying out running repairs on the running set.

Type 117 DMU

Work on the type 117 DMU continues. The gutters are in the process of being removed and moved to close the gaps, which will prevent water running down window seams. A rebuilt door has been fitted to the guards compartment, which has in turn shown the door pillar in a bad state of repair. A part of the roof has been covered with tarpaulin to prevent water ingress until a new roof section has been welded in place.

Derek grinds out part of the guttering.

Derek grinds out part of the guttering.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The rebuilt guards door fitted, by Michael, to the DMU. It can be seen that to the right of the door, there is a rusty panel which will need to be cut out and replaced.

BCK 21059

The team have commenced preliminary work on the Mk1 BCK, (believed to be carriage 21059). Work had started on the carriage some years ago, but was halted partway in. The new wall panels are now covered with mould which has to be cleaned off by hand. The electrics also require some attention as a previous owner stripped the original cable. We are trying to obtain electrical drawings to establish what should be installed. The passage ends of the carriage end are damaged and will need to be changed.

This is a view down the corridor - note the ceiling and floor which needs replacement.

This is a view down the corridor – note the ceiling and floor which needs replacement.

Floor damage caused by water ingress down from the single glazed windows.

Floor damage caused by water ingress down from the single glazed windows.

Geoff cleans the wall panels with oxalic acid to remove the mould.

Geoff cleans the wall panels with oxalic acid to remove the mould.

New side panels in the process of manufacture. These will be upholstered before fitting.

New side panels in the process of manufacture. These will be upholstered before fitting.


Taylor & Hubbard Diesel Mechanical Crane 81027

A photo shoot has been arranged for November, and it has been requested that the EOR crane be included. The C&W team have been working on the crane to “tidy” it up.

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This image shows the crane trailer being worked on by Eddie and Bob, viewed from the Ongar end.

The crane viewed from the North Weald end. Note the primer paint on rusted bodywork and the yellow undercoat on the jib.

The crane viewed from the North Weald end. Note the primer paint on rusted bodywork and the yellow undercoat on the jib.

Dick Savill

Carriage & Wagon Department


September 7th, 2014

Diesel Department Update – August 2014

THUMPER UNIT 205205

Since our last article things have moved on with the restoration work on the ‘Thumper Unit’.

The Motor coach cab and the Driving Trailer (DT) cab has now been completed.

Thumper Mystery

When we were preparing the DT Cab for repainting, Ken found a driver’s name; “Steve ……”   (We can’t read the rest,) and the date 22/05/2004 – the final day in service – written above the driver’s window.

Do you know who the mystery Selhurst Driver was? If so, there is an open invention for them to come down to North Weald and see the unit looking resplendent in its old Network South East colours.

Name

The Thumper also now carries the name of a former Driver’s wife in both cabs: ‘Michelle’

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Motor Coach Driving Cab

In the motor coach cab there was a major job with the fabrication and fitting of a complete new emergency cab door. The cab door is of a none standard size, much narrower than a standard door.

The whole process proved to be far harder than we expected. The original window, internal window guides and looking mechanism were reused. It was found that there was no adjustment on the hinges, or the strange emergency door looking mechanism. This was compounded by the door not fitting quite right in the opening.

It took many hours of work to marry the door with its frame correctly.

New draught excluders were also made up and fitted.

A number of cab wall panels were covered with plastic material, which needed repair or stripping off the backing and remaking. There were quite a lot of spot repairs required to other wall panels.

The flour covering also required spot repairs.

The Drivers and second man’s seats were removed and repaired . The seat cushions were recovered in correct Network South East pattern material, which proved to be a highly skilled job.

Newly constructed Emergency Door, complete with the Network South East material covered ‘Jump’ seat. Note the new draught excluders and repainted cab.

Newly constructed Emergency Door, complete with the Network South East material covered ‘Jump’ seat. Note the new draught excluders and repainted cab.

The whole cab was prepared and completely repainted. (This also took far longer than we expected.)

When preparing the paintwork we found a number a large paint runs that predated 1980 some of which we decided to leave in place as they had become part of the units history.

New transfers were obtained were fitted.

The Driving Trailer Cab

The roof of this cab had leaked water for many years. Ken, one of our younger volunteers, searched out and solved the problem on the roof, which was found to be caused by leaks where conduit passed through the roof

The second-man’s side wall was found to be completely rotten and had to be stripped out and replaced. This meant that Michael Fisher, our highly skilled engineer, had to also take out a lot of large metal housings. This took a great deal of time and effort, as many of the fixing were hard to get at. I took the opportunity to take the metal work home and paint it ready for refitting.

Due to more pressing jobs we had to leave the cab for some time before recommencing work, which was quite lucky – when we first examined the cab, we believed that we would have to replace most of the wall and roof panelling due to water damage. However, the panels dried out and proved to be in much better condition than we had believed, requiring only spot repairs.

In a similar manner to the Motor coach cab, we found some historic pain runs which we left in place.

Ken preparing DT cab for repainting.

Ken preparing DT cab for repainting.

We also attempted to respect the age of the unit (57 years being constructed in 1957 and rebuilt in the 1980’s.) leaving worn indicator plates in situ and also replacing English Electric makers plates which were hacked off control cabinets many years ago with similar transfers.

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Graham repairs a panel in the now-completed driving trailer cab.

The Engine Room

The Engine room is well on its way to completion. So far the team has taken ten months (one or two days a week) to get the engine room to its present condition. The whole of the engine room and Diesel engine / generator was cleaned of grease, oil and rust, back to a base which formed the first layer of paint. This was a very long, tedious and dirty job – at times you wondered what you had got yourself in to.

The whole of the engine room has now been repainted in the appropriate grey as has the generators and Diesel engine.

P7240153

As throughout this period the Thumper has been in use, you can imagine that you can clean up an area ready for painting and return next week to find spots of oil and dirt on your pristine base coat.

At the moment Mick and his team are painting all the pipe work in the correct colour code; Brown for Fuel oil, Pink for lubricating oil, Blue for coolant and so on. As it has been many year since the pipes were painted, we have had to trace to pipe work back to source.

Thumper Outstanding Work

The Driving Trailer cab vestibule needs some remedial work and repainting, as does the guard’s compartment.

The major job, due to ingress of water over many years, is to replace the luggage compartment roof panels and most of the wall planking, then completely repaint.

Rest Of The Fleet

03119 is now back in service, acting as the North Weald pilot shunt Loco following its top end engine overhaul.

03119 is now back in service, acting as the North Weald pilot shunt Loco following its top end engine overhaul.

Our 37 and 31 continue to give reliable service, seen resting in the head shunt at North Weald

Our 37 and 31 continue to give reliable service, seen resting in the head shunt at North Weald

The North Weald pilot engine, 03170, undergoing side rod bearing changes.

The North Weald pilot engine, 03170, undergoing side rod bearing changes.

Chris Travers

EOR Diesel Restoration Group

 


June 20th, 2014

Carriage & Wagon Update June 2014

 SPECIAL EDITION OF THE CARRIAGE AND WAGON DEPARTMENT’S DIARY AS MARK 2 TSO CARRIAGE M5136 IS RETURNED TO TRAFFIC FOR THE STEAM GALA

This  update seeks to show how the restoration of the carriage was achieved from start to finish. (The various images probably have been published  in earlier Departments Diary as parts of a general update.) This article shows the various stages of the restoration in one article.

Carriage M5136 was taken out of traffic post Christmas 2012 as the floor in the Epping end of the carriage had collapsed so badly that it was no longer safe to use; complete replacement was required. To carry out replacement the whole of the interior had to be stripped out to allow access.
The seats and all interior fittings were removed and stored at the Ongar end of the carriage. The wall panels were then removed, as the Railway Management had decided that the interior should be a wood veneer finish.

The cause of the damage was investigated, and it was found that some window frames had lost their seal between the frames and the carriage wall on the North Weald Platform one side, which allowed water to ingress into the carriage and down to the underfloor level. One of the window openings had rusted so badly, the the rust had to be cut out and a metal insertion piece welded in. All the frames on that side were removed, cleaned up, sealed and riveted back in place.

The area where most of the ingress of water occurred

The area where most of the ingress of water occurred.

Ken surveys the damaged flooring. The wall panelling has been removed and Dave can be seen in the         background preparing the carriage frame for rust treatment to be applied.

Ken surveys the damaged flooring. The wall panelling has been removed and Dave can be seen in the background preparing the carriage frame for rust treatment to be applied.

The sheet metal piece has been welded into place, the window frame replaced with new sealant and riveted  in place. The new rivets in the adjacent window can be clearly seen.

The sheet metal piece has been welded into place, the window frame replaced with new sealant and riveted in place. The new rivets in the adjacent window can be clearly seen.

As well as the windows being re-sealed on the outside, many of the double glazed windows needed to be replaced, as the seals between the glass panes had broken down, causing the windows to "fog". This is a long an laborious task, as all the old screws are corroded in place and had to be drilled and tapped out. George and Norman are seen in this image carrying out this work on one window.

As well as the windows being re-sealed on the outside, many of the double glazed windows needed to be replaced, as the seals between the glass panes had broken down, causing the windows to “fog”. This is a long an laborious task, as all the old screws are corroded in place and had to be drilled and tapped out. George and Norman are seen in this image carrying out this work on one window.

New wall panels were manufactured and installed. They were stained to the required shade, and then many coats of Danish Teak Oil were applied to give an overall pleasing sheen to the panels.

New wall panels were manufactured and installed. They were stained to the required shade, and then many coats of Danish Teak Oil were applied to give an overall pleasing sheen to the panels.

Now that the wall panels have been fitted and the window glass replaced where required the window trims have been refitted, the carriage had started to look towards completion.

Now that the wall panels have been fitted and the window glass replaced where required the window trims have been refitted, the carriage had started to look towards completion.

The insulation has been laid and now the linoleum floor has been installed. This was a break, as now the carriage could be reinstalled and completed.

The insulation has been laid and now the linoleum floor has been installed. This was a break, as now the carriage could be reinstalled and completed.

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The skirting has been installed, and now the seat frames are being re-installed ready for the seats themselves.

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All done – seats installed luggage racks in place.

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The C&W department were asked, unexpectedly, to improve the appearance of the outside of the carriage, where the window frames were resealed to the body. We have to look towards the Ongar end, probably winter 2014.

Dick Savill

Carriage & Wagon Department